Industry News Category

Weather

Hands hold hail after a storm

The Truth About Hail Damage in Colorado

There's no getting around the fact that the Front Range sits squarely in what's been called "Hail Alley." It's not just that we get a lot of hailstorms in the summer, but when we get them they tend to dump a lot of hail and it can get pretty big.
A street sign in partially underwater in a flood

Let's Talk About Flood Insurance

We learned this firsthand in 2013 when floodwaters all but destroyed the town of Lyons and inundated the Longmont area and nearby Weld County. But flooding is a concern outside of Northern Colorado as well.
Hail in someones hands

Hail Season is Here in Colorado. Are You Ready?

For homeowners, there’s no telling when or where exactly a hail storm will strike, so it’s important to review your property ahead of time so you’ll be able to spot potential damage later on and protect yourself now.
A hail storm on a home

Colorado Destroys Buildings. Here's How

While no structural engineer or building construction company can guarantee with certainty that a structure is 100 percent protected from extreme Colorado weather events, it can be more costly in the long-term to skimp on paying for professionals to advise you on building code compliance, the best building material to use and what your structure needs regarding expansive soil and extreme weather.
Two Hands Holding Hail

It’s Hail Season in Colorado. Here’s What You Need to Know

Monday, May 8, 2017 should not have been a particularly eventful day, but in parts of Colorado’s Front Range it turned into a day that few will likely ever forget. A massive thunderstorm rolled through the metro area that afternoon, dropping baseball-sized hail on much of the city right in the middle of the evening rush hour, smashing car windows, damaging homes, and leaving piles of hail.
A worker fixes an air conditioning unit

Preparing Your Home Cooling System for Summer

So it can be hot on the Front Range.‍ Traditionally, this has been a problem due to the fact that many historic homes in the region were not designed with warm weather in mind and often do not have cooling systems.